My hubby has another spouse living outside of the U.S.: Can I be a U.S. resident?

My hubby has another spouse living outside of the U.S.: Can I be a U.S. resident?

You simply will not be eligible for a citizenship if you have married only once if you are part of a polygamous web of family relationships, even.

I will be an appropriate resident that is permanent of united states of america. I simply discovered that my hubby, a U.S. resident, has an other woman ( by having a baby that is new back inside our house country. My better half states he could be married to her there, but that this wouldn’t have effect on our everyday lives right right here in the us. But i do want to submit an application for U.S. citizenship. I obtained my green card with my better half, if we get divorced so he says I will lose my permanent residency. Will my husband’s situation be a challenge I apply to naturalize for me when?

Yes. Your husband’s bigamy (being lawfully hitched to two females during the same time) might lead to your interviewing officer at united states of america Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to determine you are exercising polygamy. Practicing polygamy will disqualify you for citizenship, and might end up in your deportation also.

It is impossible as you are able to genuinely respond to the questions in the Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) without telling USCIS that your husband happens to be hitched to two females during the exact same time. The shape N-400 requests your complete wedding history along with your husband’s complete wedding history. Moreover it calls for you to definitely record your entire kiddies – biological, used, or step – and underneath the legislation, any youngster that the spouse has you is also your child, whether or not you are the biological mother while he is married to.

You could find this aggravating – after all, you aren’t hitched to two different people, and also you have actuallyn’t done any such thing incorrect. ادامه خواندن “My hubby has another spouse living outside of the U.S.: Can I be a U.S. resident?”